Zoom Parenting and The Rise of Permissibility

We all know about helicopter parents. But now in the 24-7 hybrid house-conference room-classroom, leniency is the new currency as at-home as parents try to preoccupy their kids during the work day to prevent zoom video bombs, which (35%) of Americans have experienced. As half of parents (49%) have increased their use of virtual meeting sites, over a third (35%) say they have experienced kids making cameos on video or conference calls. Dads are more freaked out about this (43% vs. 29% women), while Moms say to Dads, ‘welcome to the show’. Over half of parents (54%) have been giving in to more screen time to preoccupy kids since the stay-home orders and more than 2 in 5 Americans (43%) have been relying on more treats/snacks to keep their kids happy. (New data we’ll release Friday in the Wall Street Journal shows that streaming services are the new toiletpaper of the pandemic). Finally, nearly a third of parents (32%) have been buying more toys, books or games to preoccupy kids, especially stressed out Dads (39% vs. 25% women). 

And with rising cabin fever and not a lot of space, Parents with kids in the household are 2x more likely than adults with no kids to increase consumption of gaming and other in-home entertainment to keep their kids busy (60% vs 33% adults with no kids in HH). Over half of Americans (54%) have felt cabin fever and over a third (35%) have felt claustrophobic (unable to escape my home) since the stay-home orders have gone into effect. 

To combat tight living quarters, 70% of parents have increase use of streaming services (vs 42% of adults with no kids in the HH), 65% of parents have increase use of social media (vs 40% of adults with no kids in the HH); 52% of parents have increased use of music apps (vs 22% adults with no kids in the HH) and 33% of parents have increased use of food delivery apps (vs 16% adults with no kids in the HH). Finally, 28% of parents have increased use of podcasts (vs 12% adults with no kids in the HH). Any diversion seems worth a try. 

Lastly, online learning is easier than it sounds: Close to a third of parents (31%) are frustrated with online schooling systems. Dads are more likely than moms (37% vs 27%) suggesting their understanding of the work/life balance and attention to home affairs is still lacking. 

Takeaway: Potential dislocation could be the new normal meaning Americans will rethink their homes as bunker-goers. From remodeling to consider new at home situational work-school-life living, to stocking up to avoid shortages a number of Covid preppers will emerge in consumers that could cause new runs on products or new categories not considered as previously essential. 


METHODOLOGY
 
This survey (Wave 6) was fielded online among a nationally representative sample of 1,993 U.S adults from April 3 – 5, 2020. Wave 5 was fielded online among a nationally representative sample of 2,016 U.S adults from March 28 – 30, 2020. Wave 4 was fielded online among a nationally representative sample of 2,023 U.S adults from March 21-22, 2020. Wave 3 of the survey was fielded online among a nationally representative sample of 2,019 U.S adults from March 17-18, 2020. Wave 2 of the survey was fielded online among a nationally representative sample of 2,050 U.S adults from March14-15, 2020. Wave 1 of this survey was fielded online among a nationally representative sample of 2,019 U.S adults from March 05 – 09, 2020