Americans Believe “The Donald” Would Trump the Competition When it Comes to the U.S. Job Market

NEW YORK, N.Y. – With all the election coverage, it might be hard to believe we’re still over a year away from electing our next commander in chief (and longer still from the day our next president assumes office). Whoever next inhabits the oval office will have tough fights ahead on multiple fronts, with the added bonus of needing to work with an opposing party during highly contentious times. Who do Americans think is best equipped for the job? Well, that depends on which part of the job we’re talking about.

With 38% of Americans rating the job market in their region poorly, jobs are likely to continue to be a major issue in the race for the White House. Though this stat is greatly improved from negative sentiments captured in October of 2013 (48%) and 2011 (67%), it still outpaces current positive ratings (32%).

When asked (in open-ended questioning) which presidential candidate they think would best improve the U.S. job market, Donald Trump is the top response (26%), followed by Hillary Clinton (20%) and more distantly by Bernie Sanders (12%). No other candidates are mentioned by more than 3% of U.S. adults (and only Ben Carson even rates that high), though it’s worth noting that the much higher number of Republican candidates is likely a contributing factor in low scores for other GOP candidates.

  • Trump is the dominant figure among Republicans, with 47% naming him as the candidate who will best improve the job market. Carson is far behind at 7%. Trump also leads among Independents (26%), albeit not in quite as decisive a manner; Sanders (14%) is second among this group, narrowly ahead of Clinton (13%). Clinton leads among Democrats (to the tune of 40%), followed by Sanders (17%) and Trump (13%).
  • Looking across generations, Trump (19% Millennials, 29% Gen X, 30% Baby Boomers and 31% Matures) is the frontrunner on this issue across all generations except Millennials, among whom he shares the top spot with Clinton (19%, 17%, 23% and 23%).
  • While women (28%) and men (25%) show a similar likelihood to name Trump, women are more likely than men to point to Clinton (23% vs. 17%) while men are nearly twice as likely as women to look to Sanders (15% vs. 8%).

These are some of the results of The Harris Poll® of 2,225 U.S. adults surveyed online between October 14 and 19, 2015.

When asked more broadly to say which party they think is likely to do better at improving the job market in the U.S., 34% say Democrats and 30% select Republicans, with another 30% unsure. Focusing specifically on what Independents think, a plurality say they’re simply not sure (38%), though Republicans (29%) do pull ahead of Democrats (22%) among this group.

Reaching across the aisle

Lately it seems tough even to get a consensus within the major parties, let alone to get them to work together. But nevertheless, whoever Americans elect will need to be able to govern, and that can often mean working with members of the opposite party to do what’s best for the country. When asked (again in an open-ended manner) which candidate they feel will best be able to do this, Hillary Clinton (23%) is the clear frontrunner, followed by Donald Trump (14%), Bernie Sanders (13%) and Ben Carson (8%). All other mentions are at 2% or lower, though again it’s worth noting that many GOP candidates could be suffering from the sheer number of contenders their party currently has in the field.

  • Clinton puts in a strong showing among Democrats, with 45% saying she’d address this issue best, while 18% name Sanders. Trump (28%) leads the Republican field, followed by Carson (16%). Responses are tightly grouped among Independents, with Clinton (15%) narrowly ahead of Sanders (14%), who edges out Trump (13%), who in turn manages a small lead over Carson (11%).
  • Clinton leads across all generations (24% Millennials, 22% Gen X, 24% each Baby Boomers and Matures), while Matures are less likely than their younger counterparts to feel the Bern on this measure (17%, 16%, 10% and 3%, respectively).
  • Meanwhile, women (27%) are more likely than men (20%) to name Clinton, though it’s worth noting she holds the lead among both groups.

As for who’s trying to work across party lines to do what’s best for the country right now, just over half of Americans (53%) feel President Obama is trying to do so. Just under half (47%) say the same of Democrats in Congress, while roughly a third (32%) believe Republicans in Congress are trying to do so.

Ratings for the President and Congress we’ve got right now

Four in ten (41%) Americans give President Obama positive ratings on his overall job performance, identical to last month but well ahead of the 34% giving him positive ratings a year ago. Four in ten (41%) also give the President positive ratings for his efforts in relation to the economy, up marginally from last month (39%) and more substantially from a year ago (33%).

  • Strong majorities of Democrats give the President positive ratings (72% both overall and on the economy), while considerable majorities of Independents (66%, 65%) and vast majorities of Republicans (89% each) rate him negatively.
  • Millennials rate the President more highly than their elders, both in general (50% vs. 36% Gen X, 37% Baby Boomers, 38% Matures) and in relation to the economy (48% vs. 36%, 37% and 40%, respectively).

Ratings are up for Congress as well, though in this case “up” simply means positive sentiments have managed to make it back into the double digits (at 12%, up from 9% last month and 8% a year ago).

 


TABLE 1a

PRESIDENT OBAMA’S JOB RATING – TREND

“How would you rate the overall job President Barack Obama is doing?”

                Base: All adults

 

TREND

Positive*

Negative**

%

%

2015

October

41

59

 

September

41

59

August

40

60

July

39

61

June

38

62

May

41

59

Apr

38

62

Mar

37

63

Feb

38

62

Jan (post-SOTU)

42

58

Jan (pre-SOTU)

39

61

2014

December

33

67

 

November

35

65

October

34

66

September

30

70

August

32

68

July

34

66

June

38

62

May

38

62

April

33

67

March

35

65

February

35

65

January

32

68

2013

December

34

66

 

November

32

68

October

35

65

September

34

66

July

39

61

June

41

59

March

38

62

2012

December

45

55

 

September

41

59

April

41

59

March

40

60

January

36

64

2011

December

36

64

 

November

34

66

October

33

67

September

32

68

July

38

62

May

46

54

April

38

62

March

39

61

Feb.

42

58

Jan.

44

56

2010

Dec.

36

64

 

Nov.

38

62

Oct.

37

63

Sept.

38

62

Aug.

40

60

June

39

61

May

42

58

March

41

59

Jan.

40

60

2009

Dec.

41

59

 

Nov.

43

57

Oct.

45

55

Sept.

49

51

Aug.

51

49

June

54

46

May

59

41

April

58

42

March

55

45

*Positive = excellent or pretty good.  **Negative = only fair or poor.

 

 

TABLE 1b

PRESIDENT OBAMA’S JOB RATING – By Political Party & Generation

“How would you rate the overall job President Barack Obama is doing?”

Base: All adults

 

Total

Political Party

Generation

Rep.

Dem.

Ind.

Millennials (18-35)

Gen X (36-50)

Baby Boomers (51-69)

Matures (70+)

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

POSITIVE

41

11

72

34

50

36

37

38

    Excellent

12

1

22

12

19

8

9

10

    Pretty good

29

9

50

22

31

28

27

28

NEGATIVE

59

89

28

66

50

64

63

62

    Only fair

26

20

21

34

31

26

23

20

    Poor

33

69

7

32

19

38

41

43

Note: Percentages may not add up to 100% due to rounding

* indicates fewer than <0.5% selected this response

 

TABLE 2a

PRESIDENT OBAMA’S JOB RATING ON THE ECONOMY – TREND

“Now, turning to something different, how would you rate the overall job that President Barack Obama is doing on the economy?”

Base: All adults

 

2009

2010

March

April

May

June

Aug

Sept

Nov

Dec

Jan

Mar

Apr

May

June

Aug

Sept

Oct

Nov

Dec

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

POSITIVE (NET)

47

49

46

43

39

40

34

36

31

32

33

36

32

32

29

27

31

30

      Excellent

13

13

10

3

9

7

6

6

5

5

6

6

5

6

5

5

5

5

      Pretty good

34

36

36

34

31

33

27

30

25

27

27

30

27

26

24

22

26

25

NEGATIVE (NET)

53

51

54

57

61

60

66

64

69

68

67

64

68

68

71

73

69

70

      Only fair

30

27

30

27

25

27

30

30

31

30

31

29

32

29

31

33

30

34

      Poor

23

24

24

30

36

33

37

34

39

37

36

34

37

39

40

39

39

36

 

 

2011

2012

2013

Jan

Feb*

Mar

May

June

July

Sept

Oct

Nov

Dec

Jan

Feb

Mar

Feb

Mar

Apr

June

July

Sept

Oct

Nov

Dec

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

POSITIVE (NET)

33

33

33

32

27

26

21

23

22

25

25

32

32

36

33

39

35

33

29

30

30

29

  Excellent

7

9

5

7

5

3

2

3

3

4

2

3

5

4

6

6

5

5

4

5

6

4

  Pretty good

26

24

28

26

22

23

18

20

20

22

22

29

27

32

27

32

31

28

28

25

24

25

NEGATIVE (NET)

67

62

67

68

73

74

79

77

78

75

75

68

68

64

67

61

65

67

71

70

70

71

   Only fair

30

22

29

28

30

33

33

36

32

34

34

30

29

26

26

26

29

29

31

28

29

30

   Poor

37

39

38

40

43

41

46

41

46

41

41

38

39

38

41

35

36

38

40

42

41

41

 

 

2014

2015

 

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

June

July

Aug

Sept

Oct

Nov

Dec

Jan (pre-SOTU)

Jan (Post-SOTU)

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

June

July

Aug

Sept

Oct

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

POSITIVE (NET)

28

31

31

32

35

32

30

30

29

33

35

34

39

42

40

38

38

39

36

38

40

39

41

      Excellent

5

4

5

5

5

7

7

6

6

5

8

9

10

10

9

10

10

10

8

6

8

11

12

      Pretty good

23

27

26

27

29

25

23

25

24

27

26

25

29

32

31

28

27

29

28

31

32

29

29

NEGATIVE (NET)

72

69

69

68

65

68

70

70

71

67

65

66

61

58

60

62

62

61

64

62

60

61

59

      Only fair

30

29

27

29

26

28

27

31

31

29

29

30

26

27

28

28

28

25

28

27

24

25

26

      Poor

42

40

42

39

39

40

43

39

40

38

36

36

34

31

32

34

35

35

35

36

36

35

33

Note: Percentages may not add up exactly to 100% due to rounding; *In February 2012 “Not at all sure” was offered as a response choice and 4% responded in that way.

 


TABLE 2b

PRESIDENT OBAMA’S JOB RATING ON THE ECONOMY – By Political Party & Generation

“How would you rate the overall job that President Barack Obama is doing on the economy?”

Base: All adults

 

Total

Political Party

Generation

Rep.

Dem.

Ind.

Millennials (18-35)

Gen X (36-50)

Baby Boomers (51-69)

Matures (70+)

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

POSITIVE

41

11

72

35

48

36

37

40

    Excellent

12

2

20

13

18

8

9

10

    Pretty good

29

9

52

21

30

28

28

30

NEGATIVE

59

89

28

65

52

64

63

60

    Only fair

26

22

20

32

30

28

24

19

    Poor

33

68

9

33

22

36

39

41

Note: Percentages may not add up to 100% due to rounding 

 

TABLE 3a

CONGRESS’ OVERALL JOB RATING – Trend

“How would you rate the overall job Congress is doing?”

Base: All adults

 

TREND

Positive*

Negative**

%

%

2015

October

12

88

 

September

9

91

August

10

90

July

11

89

June

9

91

May

9

91

April

9

91

March

7

93

February

9

91

Jan (post-SOTU)

10

90

Jan (Pre-SOTU)

9

91

2014

December

7

93

 

October

8

92

September

7

93

August

8

92

July

9

91

June

10

90

May

7

93

April

7

93

March

8

92

February

8

92

January

6

94

2013

December

5

95

 

November

7

93

October

4

96

September

7

93

July

9

91

June

9

91

March

6

94

2012

December

8

92

 

April

11

89

March

9

91

January

6

94

2011

December

5

95

 

July

8

92

May

13

87

January

16

84

2010

December

11

89

 

June

14

86

March

10

90

Jan.

16

84

2009

Dec.

17

83

 

Oct.

16

84

June

25

75

March

29

71

2008

October

10

86

 

August

18

77

June

13

83

February

20

76

2007

December

17

79

 

October

20

77

April

27

69

February

33

62

2006

September

24

73

 

May

18

80

February

25

71

January

25

72

*Positive = excellent or pretty good.  **Negative = only fair or poor.

 

TABLE 3b

CONGRESS’ OVERALL JOB RATING – By Political Party & Generation

“How would you rate the overall job Congress is doing?”

  Base: All adults

 

Total

Political Party

Generation

Rep.

Dem.

Ind.

Millennials (18-35)

Gen X (36-50)

Baby Boomers (51-69)

Matures (70+)

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

POSITIVE

12

6

16

13

23

9

8

3

    Excellent

3

2

2

7

7

1

1

    Pretty good

9

5

14

6

15

7

7

3

NEGATIVE

88

94

84

87

77

91

92

97

    Only fair

32

40

33

24

36

31

31

30

    Poor

55

54

51

63

41

60

61

67

  Note: Percentages may not add up to 100% due to rounding

* indicates fewer than <0.5% selected this response

— indicates no selections for this response


TABLE 4a

WHO IS/IS NOT TRYING TO WORK WITH MEMBERS OF OPPOSITE PARTY TO DO WHAT’S BEST FOR THE COUNTRY

Grid Summary

 “How much do you think each of the following is really trying to work with members of the opposite party to do what is best for the country?”

Base:  All adults

 

Very much/ Somewhat (NET)

Very much

Somewhat

Not very much/Not at all (NET)

Not very much

Not at all

Not at all sure

President Obama

%

53

27

26

43

14

29

4

Democrats in Congress

%

47

14

33

48

23

25

5

Republicans in Congress

%

32

7

25

62

28

35

6

Note: Percentages may not add up exactly to 100 percent due to rounding

 

 

TABLE 4b

WHO IS TRYING TO WORK WITH MEMBERS OF OPPOSITE PARTY TO DO WHAT’S BEST FOR THE COUNTRY

“Very much/Somewhat” Summary – By Political Party & Generation

“How much do you think each of the following is really trying to work with members of the opposite party to do what is best for the country?”

Base: All adults

 

2011 Total

2015 Total

Political Party

Generation

Rep.

Dem.

Ind.

Millennials (18-35)

Gen X (36-50)

Baby Boomers (51-69)

Matures (70+)

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

President Obama

57

53

17

85

52

64

51

48

46

Democrats in Congress

40

47

18

78

42

58

42

41

45

Republicans in Congress

28

32

49

23

32

40

32

28

20

 

TABLE 5

WHICH CANDIDATE WOULD BEST WORK WITH MEMBERS OF OPPOSITE PARTY TO DO WHAT’S BEST FOR THE COUNTRY

By Political Party, Generation & Gender

“Of all the candidates currently running for president, who do you think would do the best job of working with members of the opposite party to do what is best for the country?”

Base: All adults

 

Total

Political Party

Generation

Gender

Rep.

Dem.

Ind.

Millennials (18-35)

Gen X (36-50)

Baby Boomers (51-69)

Matures (70+)

Men

Women

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

Hillary Clinton

23

5

45

15

24

22

24

24

20

27

Donald Trump

14

28

6

13

10

16

16

14

16

13

Bernie Sanders

13

5

18

14

17

16

10

3

14

12

Ben Carson

8

16

2

11

7

10

7

13

8

8

Jeb Bush

2

5

1

2

1

2

4

4

4

1

Marco Rubio

2

6

2

2

2

3

2

2

2

Rand Paul

1

2

*

1

2

1

1

2

1

Joe Biden

1

*

1

2

*

1

1

2

1

1

John Kasich

1

*

1

2

*

1

1

3

1

1

Ted Cruz

1

2

1

1

1

2

1

*

Carly Fiorina

1

1

*

1

1

2

1

*

1

1

Chris Christie

1

2

*

1

*

1

1

1

1

1

Mike Huckabee

*

1

*

1

*

1

1

*

*

Barack Obama

*

*

*

1

1

*

1

*

Martin O’Malley

*

1

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

Jim Webb

*

*

*

*

*

*

1

*

*

Democrats (unspecific)

*

1

*

*

*

*

*

Republicans/GOP (unspecific)

*

*

*

*

All of them/All the same

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

Other

1

1

1

2

1

*

1

1

1

*

None

12

8

10

16

15

8

12

11

15

10

Don’t know

11

10

8

10

9

9

12

14

6

15

Decline to answer

6

6

6

5

9

5

4

4

6

5

Note: Percentages may not add up exactly to 100 percent due to rounding

* indicates fewer than <0.5% selected this response

— indicates no selections for this response

 

 

 


TABLE 6a

RIGHT DIRECTION OR WRONG TRACK – TREND

“Generally speaking, would you say things in the country are going in the right direction or have they pretty seriously gotten off on the wrong track?”

Base: All adults

 

TREND

Right Direction

Wrong Track

%

%

2015

October

34

66

 

September

32

68

August

34

66

July

34

66

June

30

70

May

35

65

April

33

67

March

35

65

Feb

38

62

Jan (Post-SOTU)

44

56

Jan (Pre-SOTU)

38

62

2014

December

30

70

 

November

34

66

October

34

66

September

29

71

August

32

68

July

31

69

June

33

67

May

35

65

April

34

66

March

34

66

February

34

66

January

31

69

2013

December

33

67

 

November

30

70

October

20

80

September

29

71

July

34

66

May

39

61

2012

March

34

66

 

January

27

73

2011

August

16

84

 

May

39

61

2010

December

29

71

 

April

39

61

2009

August

46

54

 

January

19

72

2008

October

11

83

 

February

23

69

2007

December

18

74

 

February

29

62

2006

May

24

69

 

February

32

59

2005

November

27

68

 

January

46

48

2004

September

38

57

 

June

35

59

2003

December

35

57

 

June

44

51

2002

December

36

57

 

June

46

48

2001

December

65

32

 

June

43

52

2000

October

50

41

 

June

40

51

1999

June

37

55

 

March

47

45

1998

December

43

51

 

June

48

44

1997

December

39

56

 

April

36

55

1996

December

38

50

 

June

29

64

1995

December

26

62

 

June

24

65

1994

December

29

63

 

June

28

65

1993

June

21

70

 

March

39

50

1992

June

12

81

 

January

20

75

1991

December

17

75

 

January

58

32

 

 

TABLE 6b

RIGHT DIRECTION OR WRONG TRACK – By Political Party, Generation & Ethnicity/Race

“Generally speaking, would you say things in the country are going in the right direction or have they pretty seriously gotten off on the wrong track?”

Base: All adults

 

Total

Political Party

Generation

Gender

Rep.

Dem.

Ind.

Millennials (18-35)

Gen X (36-50)

Baby Boomers (51-69)

Matures (70+)

Men

Women

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

Right direction

34

14

56

31

43

32

30

26

40

29

Wrong track

66

86

44

69

57

68

70

74

60

71

Note: Percentages may not add up to 100% due to rounding

 

TABLE 7a

RATING OF CURRENT JOB MARKET IN YOUR REGION – TREND

“How would you rate the current job market of your region of the nation?”

Base:  All adults

 

2008

2009

2010

June

July

Jan

April

June

Aug

Sept

Oct

Nov

Dec

Jan

Mar.

April

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

GOOD (NET)

28

30

6

12

9

8

10

10

8

9

10

8

10

Neither good nor bad

18

19

18

20

19

21

22

20

18

19

20

18

21

BAD (NET)

53

51

76

68

72

71

68

70

73

72

70

73

70

 

 

2010

2011

May

June

Aug

Sept

Oct

Nov

Dec

Jan

Feb

Mar

May

July

Sept

Oct

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

GOOD (NET)

12

10

12

10

13

11

13

13

15

13

16

12

11

9

Neither good nor bad

20

25

22

21

21

23

24

22

24

22

23

24

22

24

BAD (NET)

68

66

66

69

66

66

63

65

61

65

61

64

67

67

 

 

2012

2013

2014

2015

Jan

March

Feb

Aug

Oct

Jan

March

Aug

Jan

July

Oct

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

GOOD (NET)

14

20

21

23

20

21

20

26

30

31

32

Neither good nor bad

21

24

31

31

32

31

32

34

32

31

30

BAD (NET)

65

56

48

46

48

48

47

41

38

39

38

Note: Percentages may not add to 100% due to rounding

 

 

TABLE 7b

RATING OF CURRENT JOB MARKET IN YOUR REGION

By Region, Generation, Gender & Political Party

“How would you rate the current job market of your region of the nation?”

Base:  All adults

 

Total

Region

Generation

Gender

Political Party

East

Midwest

South

West

Millennials (18-35)

Gen Xers (36-50)

Baby Boomers (51-69)

Matures (70+)

Men

Women

Rep

Dem

Ind

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

GOOD (NET)

32

22

30

33

39

38

27

30

27

37

27

18

47

31

     Very good

7

3

5

5

14

12

3

5

3

9

4

3

9

9

     Somewhat good

25

19

25

29

25

26

24

26

24

27

23

15

39

23

Neither good nor bad

30

35

32

30

23

31

28

29

34

28

32

25

29

32

BAD (NET)

38

43

38

36

38

31

45

40

39

35

41

57

24

37

     Somewhat bad

26

31

25

24

26

22

29

27

28

24

28

37

17

27

     Very bad

12

12

13

12

13

8

16

13

11

11

13

20

7

11

Note: Percentages may not add to 100% due to rounding

 


TABLE 8

POLITICAL PARTY MOST LIKELY TO IMPROVE JOB MARKET

By Region, Generation, Political Party & Current Job Market Rating

“Which political party do you think is likely to do a better job of improving the job market in the United States?”

Base:  All adults

 

Total

Generation

Gender

Political Party

Millennials (18-35)

Gen Xers (36-50)

Baby Boomers (51-69)

Matures (70+)

Men

Women

Rep

Dem

Ind

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

Democratic Party

34

35

32

33

38

35

33

4

72

22

Republican Party

30

29

31

30

30

34

26

74

5

29

Other

6

7

8

5

5

5

7

2

2

11

Not at all sure

30

28

30

32

27

25

34

19

22

38

Note: Percentages may not add to 100% due to rounding

 

 


TABLE 9

WHICH CANDIDATE WOULD DO THE BEST JOB OF IMPROVING THE U.S. JOB MARKET

By Political Party, Generation & Gender

“Of all the candidates currently running for president, who do you think would do the best job of improving the job market in the United States?”

Base: All adults

 

Total

Political Party

Generation

Gender

Rep.

Dem.

Ind.

Millennials (18-35)

Gen X (36-50)

Baby Boomers (51-69)

Matures (70+)

Men

Women

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

Donald Trump

26

47

13

26

19

29

30

31

28

25

Hillary Clinton

20

5

40

13

19

17

23

23

17

23

Bernie Sanders

12

3

17

14

15

12

9

8

15

8

Ben Carson

3

7

1

4

4

3

3

2

3

3

Jeb Bush

2

4

1

2

1

2

2

2

2

2

Marco Rubio

1

4

*

1

1

2

1

1

1

1

Carly Fiorina

1

2

1

*

*

1

1

1

*

Rand Paul

1

1

*

1

1

2

*

*

1

1

Ted Cruz

1

1

1

1

1

*

1

*

Joe Biden

1

*

1

*

1

*

1

1

1

*

John Kasich

*

*

*

1

1

*

2

1

Mike Huckabee

*

1

1

1

1

*

1

*

Martin O’Malley

*

*

1

*

1

*

Barack Obama

*

*

1

*

1

*

*

*

Democrats (unspecific)

*

1

*

*

*

1

*

*

All of them/All the same

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

Chris Christie

*

1

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

Jim Webb

*

*

*

*

Republicans/GOP (unspecific)

*

*

*

*

*

Other

1

2

1

*

*

2

1

*

1

1

None

10

6

7

14

14

7

9

7

12

7

Don’t know

14

9

13

16

12

14

14

17

8

20

Decline to answer

6

5

6

5

9

6

3

3

6

6

Note: Percentages may not add up exactly to 100 percent due to rounding

* indicates fewer than <0.5% selected this response

— indicates no selections for this response

 

Methodology

This Harris Poll was conducted online within the United States between October 14 and 19, 2015 among 2,225 adults (aged 18 and over). Figures for age, sex, race/ethnicity, education, region and household income were weighted where necessary to bring them into line with their actual proportions in the population. Propensity score weighting was also used to adjust for respondents’ propensity to be online. 

All sample surveys and polls, whether or not they use probability sampling, are subject to multiple sources of error which are most often not possible to quantify or estimate, including sampling error, coverage error, error associated with nonresponse, error associated with question wording and response options, and post-survey weighting and adjustments. Therefore, The Harris Poll avoids the words “margin of error” as they are misleading. All that can be calculated are different possible sampling errors with different probabilities for pure, unweighted, random samples with 100% response rates. These are only theoretical because no published polls come close to this ideal.

Respondents for this survey were selected from among those who have agreed to participate in Harris Poll surveys. The data have been weighted to reflect the composition of the adult population. Because the sample is based on those who agreed to participate in our panel, no estimates of theoretical sampling error can be calculated.

These statements conform to the principles of disclosure of the National Council on Public Polls.

The results of this Harris Poll may not be used in advertising, marketing or promotion without the prior written permission of The Harris Poll.

The Harris Poll® #67, October 28, 2015

By Larry Shannon-Missal, Managing Editor, The Harris Poll