Parents Are Unaware of Being a Major Source of Pressure on Their Teens

Parents know their teenagers face tremendous pressure in today’s fast-paced world. However, a new survey from Caron Treatment Centers finds that parents are either unaware or in denial that their teens view them – not their peers – as the most significant external trigger for pressure. The survey of 1,009 parents or guardians of teens […]

Parents know their teenagers face tremendous pressure in today’s fast-paced world. However, a new survey from Caron Treatment Centers finds that parents are either unaware or in denial that their teens view them – not their peers – as the most significant external trigger for pressure. The survey of 1,009 parents or guardians of teens ages 13-18 and 1,009 teens ages 13-18 was commissioned by Caron, a leading not-for-profit treatment provider of addiction and behavioral healthcare and conducted by The Harris Poll in July 2018.

The 2018 survey reveals that both teens and their parents feel immense pressure to perform in their lives, with the majority citing a “7” on average (on a 10-point scale). And, those under high pressure “8-10” (parents, 36%; teens, 42%) far outweigh those under low pressure “1-3” (parents, 11%; teens, 10%) by more than three times.

For parents, the leading cause of pressure stems from managing household finances (56%) and trying to save money for the future (57%). By comparison, for teenagers causes of pressure include schoolwork (74%), followed by fitting in socially with peers (49%). Still, when asked about the top external source from which they feel the most pressure, teens said their parents.

“Pressure on developing minds has the potential to change the circuitry of the brain,” says Dr. Joseph Garbely, Vice President of Medical Services and Medical Director at Caron. “It’s a very serious concern because this biological change can place teens at greater risk for mental health disorders as well as substance use and abuse.”

In fact, recent research shows that an increased number of teens now suffer from anxiety. A study published in June by the Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics found a 20% increase in diagnoses of anxiety between 2007 and 2012.

Read more at GlobeNewswire.