Those in the U.S. and the Five Largest European Nations Do Not Believe that Sanctions Imposed on Russia Because of Ukraine will Have Impact

    New York, N.Y. – May 15, 2014 – A recent Financial Times/Harris Poll in the five largest European countries and the United States looks at the current crisis in Ukraine and sanctions against Russia.

    While sometimes critics say many are not aware of what might be happening outside their country’s own borders, adults in these six countries are aware of Russia’s annexation of Crimea and the ongoing international crisis in Ukraine. More than four in five adults in Germany (87%), Spain (86%), France (85%) and Italy (84%), as well as over three-quarters of adults in Great Britain (78%) and the United States (76%) are aware of this.

    These are some of the findings of a Financial Times/Harris Poll conducted online among 5,206 adults aged 16-64 in France (1,000), Germany (1,022), Great Britain (1,030) and Spain (1,021), and adults aged 18-64 in Italy (1,019), between April 23 and 28, 2014 and 2,046 adults, 18 and older in the United States between May 8 and 12, 2014.

    Looking at reaction to Russia’s intervention in Ukraine, about half (52%) of those Americans who knew about the annexation say that the US’s reaction to the intervention was about right, but over one-third (37%) say it was too weak and one in ten (11%) say it was too strong. When it comes to the EU’s reaction to the intervention, among those who were aware of the annexation more than three in five Spaniards (63%), three in five French adults (59%), over half of Italians (55%) and almost half of Germans (48%) say the EU’s reaction was too weak. British adults who knew about the annexation are a little more divided, as 45% say it was too weak and 43% say it was about right.

    There is also a sense that the sanctions that have been imposed will not do much to curb Russia’s behavior. Looking at the sanctions the EU has imposed, among those who knew about the annexation more than four in five French (82%), four in five Britons and Germans (80% each), three-quarters of Spaniards (75%) and two-thirds of Italians (67%) all say these sanctions will not have any impact. Among U.S. adults who were aware of the annexation by Russia, two-thirds (66%) say that the existing U.S. sanctions that have been imposed will not have any impact on Russia’s behavior.

    In fact, strong majorities of those who were aware of the annexation in each of these six countries would support harsher sanctions against Russia. Almost three-quarters of Spaniards (74%) and Americans (73%), seven in ten Italians (72%), Britons (71%) and French (69%) and three in five Germans (61%) all say they would support tougher sanctions against Russia. One-third of Spaniards who knew about the annexation (33%) and almost three in ten Americans (28%) would strongly support tougher sanctions.

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    TABLE 1

    AWARENESS OF RUSSIA’S ANNEXATION OF CRIMEA

    Were you aware before now of Russia’s annexation of Crimea and the ongoing international crisis in Ukraine?

    Base: All EU adults in five countries

    United States

    Great Britain

    France

    Italy

    Spain

    Germany

    %

    %

    %

    %

    %

    %

    Yes

    76

    78

    85

    84

    86

    87

    No

    24

    22

    15

    16

    14

    13

    Note: Percentages may not add up to 100% due to rounding

     

    TABLE 2

    STRENGTH OF EU’S REACTION TO RUSSIA’S INTERVENTION

    Do you believe the US/EU’s reaction to Russia’s intervention in Ukraine to have beenÉ?

    Base: All EU adults in five countries who are aware of annexation

    United States

    Great Britain

    France

    Italy

    Spain

    Germany

    %

    %

    %

    %

    %

    %

    Too strong

    11

    12

    12

    13

    9

    18

    About right

    52

    43

    29

    32

    28

    34

    Too weak

    37

    45

    59

    55

    63

    48

    Note: Percentages may not add up to 100% due to rounding

     

    TABLE 3

    IMPACT OF SANCTIONS ON RUSSIA’S BEHAVIOUR

    And do you believe existing US/EU sanctions will curb Russia’s behaviour?

    Base: All EU adults in five countries who are aware of annexation

    United
    , States

    Great Britain

    France

    Italy

    Spain

    Germany

    %

    %

    %

    %

    %

    %

    Any yes (NET)

    34

    20

    18

    33

    25

    20

    Yes, definitely

    4

    2

    2

    1

    1

    1

    Yes, somewhat

    30

    18

    16

    32

    23

    19

    No, it won’t have any impact

    66

    80

    82

    67

    75

    80

    Note: Percentages may not add up to 100% due to rounding


    TABLE 4

    SUPPORT FOR TOUGHER SANCTIONS AGAINST RUSSIA

    To what extent would you support or oppose tougher sanctions against Russia?

    Base: All EU adults in five countries who are aware of annexation

    United States

    Great Britain

    France

    Italy

    Spain

    Germany

    %

    %

    %

    %

    %

    %

    Support (NET)

    73

    71

    69

    72

    74

    61

    Strongly support

    28

    23

    24

    21

    33

    19

    Somewhat support

    45

    48

    45

    51

    41

    43

    Oppose (NET)

    27

    29

    31

    28

    26

    39

    Somewhat oppose

    18

    21

    21

    20

    19

    25

    Strongly oppose

    9

    8

    10

    8

    7

    14

    Note: Percentages may not add up to 100% due to rounding

    Methodology

    This FT/Harris Poll was conducted online by Harris Interactive among a total of 5,206 adults aged 16-64 in France (1,000), Germany (1,022), Great Britain (1,030), Spain (1,021), and adults aged 18-64 in Italy (1,019), between April 23 and 28, 2014 and 2,046 adults, aged 18 and older in the United States between May 8 and 12, 2014. Figures for age, sex, education, region and Internet usage were weighted where necessary to bring them into line with their actual proportions in the population. Propensity score weighting was used to adjust for respondents’ propensity to be online.

    All sample surveys and polls, whether or not they use probability sampling, are subject to multiple sources of error which are most often not possible to quantify or estimate, including sampling error, coverage error, error associated with nonresponse, error associated with question wording and response options, and post-survey weighting and adjustments. Therefore, The Harris Poll avoids the words margin of error as they are misleading. All that can be calculated are different possible sampling errors with different probabilities for pure, unweighted, random samples with 100% response rates. These are only theoretical because no published polls come close to this ideal.

    Respondents for this survey were selected from among those who have agreed to participate in Harris Poll surveys. The data have been weighted to reflect the composition of the adult population. Because the sample is based on those who agreed to participate in our panel, no estimates of theoretical sampling error can be calculated.

    The results of this Harris Poll may not be used in advertising, marketing or promotion without the prior written permission of The Harris Poll.

    These statements conform to the principles of disclosure of the National Council on Public Polls and the British Polling Council.

    The Harris Poll #48, May 15, 2014

    By Regina A. Corso, VP, Harris Poll and Public Relations

    About Nielsen & The Harris Poll

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