New Facebook Glitch Hits 14 Million Users Amid Deep Consumer Anxiety Over Data Privacy

Facebook is in the throes of another data privacy scandal. A recent glitch automatically made the private status updates of up to 14 million Facebook users public. The incident took place between May 18 and 22. Facebook told TechCrunch that the bug occurred while testing a new “featured items” option that would allow users to highlight photos […]

Facebook is in the throes of another data privacy scandal. A recent glitch automatically made the private status updates of up to 14 million Facebook users public. The incident took place between May 18 and 22.

Facebook told TechCrunch that the bug occurred while testing a new “featured items” option that would allow users to highlight photos and other content on their profiles. The glitch was fully rectified by May 27

As usual, the social media giant has issued an apology for the bug and has begun reaching out to affected users. This latest addition to its string of data privacy issues may impact the company’s already declining reputation. In the Harris Poll’s annual Reputation Quotient survey administered in December and January 2017, 45% of respondents said Facebook had a positive reputation. That number fell to 35% in a survey Harris conducted for Fast Company in March 2018, only days after the Cambridge Analytica scandal. Even Facebook’s leadership came under public scrutiny as the survey shows a drop in the public’s perception of Facebook’s leadership. The number of people who said Facebook had an excellent leadership fell from 45% in the RQ study to just 22% in the Fast Company-Harris poll.

Their declining reputation and public’s distrust reveal growing concerns over data privacy. A recent nationwide survey The Harris Poll conducted on behalf of IBM uncovered deep consumer anxiety over data privacy and security as 85% of consumers say businesses should be doing more to actively protect their data. In fact, more than half (60%) of consumers were more concerned about cybersecurity than a potential war.