Are The Online Marketing Efforts of TV Shows and Programs Worthwhile?

    New York, N.Y. – March 30, 2011 – Marketers are increasingly spending time, money and creativity to reach their audiences in non-traditional ways. A recent24/7 Wall St./Harris Poll on Social Media and Television set out to see if these efforts are paying off. It found that many Americans are participating in this type of interactions. Among online U.S. adults, two in five say they have gone online or utilized social media to comment, post, watch or read something about a television show or program (43%). Among these 80-some million people, a third say they have done so after watching a TV show or program (33%) and fewer say they have done so either before watching (18%) or while watching (17%) a TV show or program.

    These are some of the findings of a new 24/7 Wall St./Harris Poll survey of 2,526 U.S. adults surveyed online between March 11 and 15, 2011 by Harris Interactive.

    Younger online adults are much more likely to take part in these activities than are older people- six in ten of those 18-34 say they have engaged with TV programs in this way (59%), compared to fewer adults aged 35-44 (40%), 45-54 (36%) and 55 and older (28%) who say the same. When adults are doing these things also varies by age. Three in ten of those 18-34 years (31%) say they have gone online to do these activities while watching a TV program, compared to very few adults 55 and older who have done the same (5%). Adults 55 and older, on the other hand, are most likely to go online after seeing a TV program (22%) if they are going to go online at all.

    This poll also finds that:

    • Half of adults who engage with TV shows or programs online (53%) do so in an individual forum such as by posting on their own or a friend’s Facebook page, Twitter account or blog, 44% do so on a website or page created by the TV content provider such as a TV network’s Facebook page or website, and a third (33%) do so on a separate media outlet’s site, such as an entertainment or news site;
    • Women are more likely than men to engage in an individual forum (57% vs. 50%), while men are more likely than women to do so on a separate media outlet’s site (38% vs. 27%);
    • Younger adults are more likely than those older to engage individually while older adults are somewhat more likely to do so on a site or page created by the content provider;
    • Two in five online adults are a fan or a follower of a TV network, program or show on Facebook or Twitter (39%) while the same number are not (41%); one in five do not use Facebook or Twitter (20%);
    • Three quarters of adults who engage with TV programs or shows online say that it provides more information, which is an important reason why they do it (76%), two thirds say the analysis or summary is important to them (68%) or it’s a source of additional entertainment, which is important (67%); half say that it’s important that they engage with other viewers (51%);
    • All age groups are equally likely to place importance on finding additional information online (between 75% and 77%), but younger adults are more likely to place importance on engaging with other viewers (54% of those 18-34 and 56% of those 35-44 compared to 40% of those 55 and older); and
    • Among the online adults who do not comment, post, watch, view or read anything about TV programs or shows online, six in ten say it’s because they don’t want or need to (60%), a third say they don’t think about it (34%), one in five say they don’t have the time (20%) and fewer list privacy (12%) or other reasons (7%).

    So What?

    Many TV networks, programs and shows are investing in websites, online programming and social media outreach to further capture and engage their audiences, and, most online adults are aware of these efforts – almost six in ten say that when watching a program on television they are aware of additional material available online (57%). However, depending on who a marketer wants to target, they might be well advised to focus their efforts accordingly since this poll makes clear that different groups sign online in different ways, and at different times.

     

    TABLE 1

    UTILIZED TECHNOLOGY OR SOCIAL MEDIA WITH REGARDS TO TV PROGRAMS

    Have you ever gone online or utilized social media to comment, post, watch or read anything about a television show or program? Please select all that apply.

    Base: All online U.S. adults

    Total

    Age

    Education

    18-34

    35-44

    45-54

    55+

    H.S. or less

    Some college

    College grad +

    %

    %

    %

    %

    %

    %

    %

    %

    Engages with programs online (NET)

    43

    59

    40

    36

    28

    35

    47

    48

    Yes, before watching the program

    18

    28

    18

    14

    8

    13

    22

    21

    Yes, while watching the program

    17

    31

    16

    10

    5

    12

    19

    21

    Yes, after watching the program

    33

    42

    33

    31

    22

    26

    37

    38

    No I have never used technology or social media in this way

    57

    41

    60

    64

    72

    65

    53

    52

    Total

    Gender

    Children in HH

    Male

    Female

    Child in HH

    No Child in HH

    %

    %

    %

    %

    %

    Engages with programs online (NET)

    43

    43

    42

    47

    40

    Yes, before watching the program

    18

    19

    18

    20

    17

    Yes, while watching the program

    17

    19

    14

    21

    15

    Yes, after watching the program

    33

    31

    35

    36

    32

    No I have never used technology or social media in this way

    57

    57

    58

    53

    60

    Note: Multiple response

     

    TABLE 2

    WAYS TECHNOLOGY AND SOCIAL MEDIA HAS BEEN USED

    How have you used technology or social media to comment, post, watch or read about what you’ve seen on television? Please select all that apply.

    Base: Adults who have engaged with TV programs online

    Total

    Gender

    Age

    Male

    Female

    18-34

    35-44

    45-54

    55+

    %

    %

    %

    %

    %

    %

    %

    In an individual forum (e.g., posting on my own or a friend’s Facebook page, Twitter account, blog posting)

    53

    50

    57

    61

    59

    44

    35

    On a website or page created by the content provider (e.g., a television network’s Facebook page, network’s website)

    44

    45

    44

    41

    42

    52

    47

    On a separate media outlet’s site (e.g., an entertainment or news site or blog)

    33

    38

    27

    34

    34

    33

    28

    Other

    9

    9

    8

    9

    6

    6

    13

    Note: Multiple response

     

    TABLE 3A

    IMPORTANT REASONS FOR USING ONLINE RESOURCES FOR TV PROGRAMS

    How important to you, if at all, are each of the reasons for why you go online to comment, post, watch or read about television shows or programs?

    Base: Adults who have engaged with TV programs online (43% of all online adults)

    Important (NET)

    Very important

    Somewhat important

    Not important (NET)

    Not very important

    Not at all important

    %

    %

    %

    %

    %

    %

    Provides more information

    76

    22

    54

    24

    17

    8

    The analysis or summary

    68

    14

    53

    32

    21

    12

    A source of additional entertainment

    67

    15

    52

    33

    20

    13

    Engage with other viewers

    51

    12

    39

    49

    24

    25

    Note: Percentages may not add up to 100% due to rounding

     

    TABLE 3B

    IMPORTANT REASONS FOR USING ONLINE RESOURCES FOR TV PROGRAMS

    How important to you, if at all, are each of the reasons for why you go online to comment, post, watch or read about television shows or programs?

    Summary of those saying very important or somewhat important

    Base: Adults who have engaged with TV programs online (43% of all online adults)

    Total

    Age

    18-34

    35-44

    45-54

    55+

    %

    %

    %

    %

    %

    Provides more information

    76

    76

    76

    77

    75

    The analysis or summary

    68

    68

    68

    66

    67

    A source of additional entertainment

    67

    69

    75

    62

    56

    Engage with other viewers

    51

    54

    56

    47

    40

    Note: Percentages may not add up to 100% due to rounding

     

    TABLE 4

    WHY SOME PEOPLE DON’T GO ONLINE FOR TV PROGRAMS

    Which of the following, if any, are reasons why you do not go online to comment, post, watch, view or read about television shows or programs? Please select all that apply.

    Base: Online adults who do not engage with TV programs online (57% of all online adults)

    Total

    Age

    18-34

    35-44

    45-54

    55+

    %

    %

    %

    %

    %

    I don’t want/need to.

    60

    55

    62

    59

    62

    I don’t think about it.

    34

    38

    34

    33

    31

    I don’t have time.

    20

    27

    23

    20

    13

    Privacy reasons

    12

    12

    10

    11

    14

    Other

    7

    8

    6

    7

    5

    Note: Multiple response

     

    TABLE 5

    FOLLOW TV SHOWS OR PROGRAMS ON FACEBOOK OR TWITTER

    Are you a fan on Facebook, or a follower on Twitter of any television networks, programs or shows?

    Base: All online U.S. adults

    Total

    Age

    Gender

    18-34

    35-44

    45-54

    55+

    Male

    Female

    %

    %

    %

    %

    %

    %

    %

    Yes (fan or follower)

    39

    51

    42

    33

    25

    34

    44

    No (not a fan or follower)

    41

    36

    39

    43

    46

    45

    36

    Not applicable – I do not ure Facebook or Twitter

    20

    12

    19

    24

    29

    21

    20

    Note: Percentages may not add to 100% due to rounding

     

    TABLE 6

    AWARENESS OF ADDITIONAL MATERIAL ONLINE

    Some television networks and programs create additional online content. When you are watching a program on television, how aware are you of any additional material (e.g., extra scenes, interviews, question and answer forums, facts and statistics) available online?

    Base: All online U.S. adults

    Total

    Age

    Gender

    18-34

    35-44

    45-54

    55+

    Male

    Female

    %

    %

    %

    %

    %

    %

    %

    Aware (NET)

    57

    64

    55

    58

    50

    60

    55

    Very aware

    12

    14

    12

    12

    10

    13

    11

    Somewhat aware

    45

    50

    43

    46

    40

    47

    44

    Not aware (NET)

    43

    36

    45

    42

    50

    40

    45

    Not very aware

    22

    24

    25

    17

    20

    22

    21

    Not at all aware

    21

    13

    20

    25

    30

    18

    24

    Note: Percentages may not add to 100% due to rounding

     

    Methodology

    This 24/7 Wall St./Harris Poll was conducted online within the United States between March 11 and 15, 2011 among 2,526 adults (aged 18 and over). Figures for age, sex, race/ethnicity, education, region and household income were weighted where necessary to bring them into line with their actual proportions in the population. Where appropriate, this data were also weighted to reflect the composition of the adult online population. Propensity score weighting was also used to adjust for respondents’ propensity to be online.

    All sample surveys and polls, whether or not they use probability sampling, are subject to multiple sources of error which are most often not possible to quantify or estimate, including sampling error, coverage error, error associated with nonresponse, error associated with question wording and response options, and post-survey weighting and adjustments. Therefore, Harris Interactive avoids the words margin of error as they are misleading. All that can be calculated are different possible sampling errors with different probabilities for pure, unweighted, random samples with 100% response rates. These are only theoretical because no published polls come close to this ideal.

    Respondents for this survey were selected from among those who have agreed to participate in Harris Interactive surveys. The data have been weighted to reflect the composition of the adult population. Because the sample is based on those who agreed to participate in the Harris Interactive panel, no estimates of theoretical sampling error can be calculated.

    These statements conform to the principles of disclosure of the National Council on Public Polls.

    The results of this Harris Poll may not be used in advertising, marketing or promotion without the prior written permission of Harris Interactive.

    The Harris Poll® #43, March 30, 2011

    By Samantha Braverman, Senior Project Researcher Harris Interactive

     

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