Two-thirds of Americans Rate Job Market in Their Region as Bad

    NEW YORK , N.Y. – October 27, 2011 – As overall economy woes continue, there has been a strong focus during this recovery on the issue of jobs. Not only is there general dissatisfaction with the current job market, it is at the lowest it’s been since over a year ago. This month, just 9% of Americans would rate the job market of their region of the nation as good while 67% would rate it as bad and one-quarter (24%) say it is neither good nor bad. This is not that different from September when 11% of U.S. adults said the job market in their region was good and 67% said it was bad.

    These are some of the results of The Harris Poll of 2,463 adults surveyed online between October 10 and 17, 2011.

    In looking at how people in specific regions of the country think about the job market, Southerners seem to be more optimistic while things seem to be the worst in the West. In theSouthm while only one in ten (11%) say the job market in their region is good, just three in five (62%) say it is bad while over one-quarter (27%) say it is neither good nor bad. Among Westerners, 8% say the job market in their region is good while three-quarterrs (74%) say it is bad.

    Increasing jobs in the U.S.

    When asked, among six suggestions, what would significantly increase jobs in the United States, more than two in five Americans (44%) say cutting government spending and two in five (40%) say cutting taxes for Americans. Over one-third of U.S. adults (36%) believe reducing business regulations would significantly increase jobs while 34% say cutting taxes on businesses and corporations, 29% say lowering interest rates, and 12% say more government spending. Almost one-quarter (22%) say none of these six actions would significantly increase jobs in the U.S.

    There are definitely partisan differences on what would increase jobs in the U.S. Republicans are much more likely than Democrats to say cutting government spending will create jobs (63% versus 27%), reducing business regulation (55% versus 19%), cutting taxes on businesses and corporations (50% versus 22%), and cutting taxes (50% versus 33%). Democrats, however, are only more likely than Republicans to say more government spending will increase jobs (21% versus 1%).

    So What?

    Americans are clearly not sure where the jobs will come from, but one thing is clear – they are definitely not happy with the current state of the job market. They are looking to someone for answers and, at the moment, they are looking towards the President. If he can give them hope, they will probably think better of him. But, they aren’t seeing that and after three years in office, this may be one of the things that cause them to look elsewhere next November.

     

    TABLE 1

    RATING OF CURRENT JOB MARKET – TREND

    How would you rate the current job market of your region of the nation?

    Base: All adults

    2008

    2009

    June

    July

    Jan

    April

    June

    Aug

    Sept

    Oct

    Nov

    Dec

    %

    %

    %

    %

    %

    %

    %

    %

    %

    %

    GOOD (NET)

    28

    30

    6

    12

    9

    8

    10

    10

    8

    9

    Neither good nor bad

    18

    19

    18

    20

    19

    21

    22

    20

    18

    19

    BAD (NET)

    53

    51

    76

    68

    72

    71

    68

    70

    73

    72

    2010

    Jan

    Mar.

    April

    May

    June

    Aug

    Sept

    Oct

    Nov

    Dec

    %

    %

    %

    %

    %

    %

    %

    %

    %

    %

    GOOD (NET)

    10

    8

    10

    12

    10

    12

    10

    13

    11

    13

    Neither good nor bad

    20

    18

    21

    20

    25

    22

    21

    21

    23

    24

    BAD (NET)

    70

    73

    70

    68

    66

    66

    69

    66

    66

    63

    Jan

    Feb

    March

    May

    July

    Sept

    Oct

    %

    %

    %

    %

    %

    %

    %

    GOOD (NET)

    13

    15

    13

    16

    12

    11

    9

    Neither good nor bad

    22

    24

    22

    23

    24

    22

    24

    BAD (NET)

    65

    61

    65

    61

    64

    67

    67

    Note: Percentages may not add to 100% due to rounding

     

    TABLE 2

    RATING OF CURRENT JOB MARKET IN YOUR REGION – BY REGION

    How would you rate the current job market of your region of the nation?

    Base: All adults

    Total

    Region

    East

    Midwest

    South

    West

    %

    %

    %

    %

    %

    GOOD (NET)

    9

    10

    7

    11

    8

    Very good

    1

    2

    1

    1

    *

    Somewhat good

    8

    7

    6

    10

    8

    Neither good nor bad

    24

    23

    25

    27

    18

    BAD (NET)

    67

    67

    67

    62

    74

    Somewhat bad

    41

    43

    44

    36

    43

    Very bad

    26

    25

    24

    26

    31

    Note: Percentages may not add to 100% due to rounding; * indicates less than .05%

     

    TABLE 3

    WHAT WOULD INCREASE JOBS

    Which of the following do you think would significantly increase jobs in the U.S.?

    Base: All adults

     

    Total

    Political Party

    Generation

    Rep.

    Dem.

    Ind.

    Echo Boomers (18-34)

    Gen X (35-46)

    Baby Boomers (47-65)

    Matures (66+)

    %

    %

    %

    %

    %

    %

    %

    %

    Cutting government spending

    44

    63

    27

    43

    37

    43

    46

    52

    Cutting taxes for Americans

    40

    50

    33

    39

    34

    45

    41

    37

    Reducing business regulation

    36

    55

    19

    40

    27

    33

    39

    50

    Cutting taxes on businesses and corporations

    34

    50

    22

    37

    25

    36

    37

    44

    Lowering interest rates

    29

    26

    28

    31

    28

    32

    30

    22

    More government spending

    12

    1

    21

    12

    13

    9

    14

    11

    None of these

    22

    12

    28

    22

    29

    25

    18

    17

    Note: Multiple responses accepted

     

    Methodology

    This Harris Poll was conducted online within the United States between October 10 and 17, 2011 among 2,463 adults (aged 18 and over). Figures for age, sex, race/ethnicity, education, region and household income were weighted where necessary to bring them into line with their actual proportions in the population. Propensity score weighting was also used to adjust for respondents’ propensity to be online.

    All sample surveys and polls, whether or not they use probability sampling, are subject to multiple sources of error which are most often not possible to quantify or estimate, including sampling error, coverage error, error associated with nonresponse, error associated with question wording and response options, and post-survey weighting and adjustments. Therefore, Harris Interactive avoids the words margin of error as they are misleading. All that can be calculated are different possible sampling errors with different probabilities for pure, unweighted, random samples with 100% response rates. These are only theoretical because no published polls come close to this ideal.

    Respondents for this survey were selected from among those who have agreed to participate in Harris Interactive surveys. The data have been weighted to reflect the composition of the adult population. Because the sample is based on those who agreed to participate in the Harris Interactive panel, no estimates of theoretical sampling error can be calculated.

    These statements conform to the principles of disclosure of the National Council on Public Polls.

    The results of this Harris Poll may not be used in advertising, marketing or promotion without the prior written permission of Harris Interactive.

    J40806

    Q720, 730

    The Harris Poll® #113, October 27, 2011

    By Regina A. Corso, SVP, Harris Poll, Public Relations and Youth Research