8 in 10 Americans Are Concerned about the Ability of Businesses to Safeguard Their Financial and Personal Information: AICPA Survey

Another day, another data breach. Recent news about cybercriminals obtaining more than 5 million credit card numbers from high-end U.S. retailers joined a series of major hacks and online data breaches. In 2017 alone, roughly 143 million U.S. adults, were hit by some form of malware, virus, spyware or phishing scam. Unfortunately, the frequency of attacks on Americans’ personal information has fostered a feeling of inevitability. In fact, according to results released today from a telephone survey conducted by The Harris Poll for the American Institute of CPAs (AICPA) of 1,006 Americans adults in the fall of 2017, nearly half of U.S. adults (48 percent) think it is at least somewhat likely identity theft will cause them financial loss in the next year.

“Protecting your information is an ongoing process that requires you to be vigilant, identify where you can improve and take action to firm up your safeguards,” said Gregory Anton, CPA, CGMA, chair of the AICPA’s National CPA Financial Literacy Commission. “This means regularly monitoring your credit card and bank statement and periodically checking your credit report for anything that looks out of the ordinary.”

While the survey finds that three out of five Americans (61 percent) have at least looked at their credit report, more than a third (35 percent) have never once checked. This is particularly alarming, as a majority of those who have checked their credit (66 percent) had to take steps with a credit reporting agency to correct inaccuracies, with the average being 13 specific corrections among those who have taken steps at least once. More distressing, those with a household income of less than $35K were found to be more likely to never have looked at their credit report than those with a household income of $100K+ (44 percent vs. 30 percent).

Read more at Business Wire.