72% of Americans Don’t Know That This Medical Condition Steals Sleep and Disrupts Lives

Sleepless nights can be costly. They interfere with daily activities and work productivity and leave one feeling tired and irritable. If left untreated, sleep loss can result in serious medical consequences. A leading cause of sleep loss is a medical condition called nocturia, which a staggering 72% of Americans have never heard about, according to a […]

Sleepless nights can be costly. They interfere with daily activities and work productivity and leave one feeling tired and irritable. If left untreated, sleep loss can result in serious medical consequences. A leading cause of sleep loss is a medical condition called nocturia, which a staggering 72% of Americans have never heard about, according to a new national online survey of 2,040 U.S. adults conducted by The Harris Poll, and endorsed by Caregiver Action Network, National Association for Continence, Prostate Conditions Education Council, and The Simon Foundation for Continence.

Nocturia forces individuals to get up more than once per night to urinate. Nocturia has many contributing causes, but in most cases, it is caused by the kidneys producing too much urine at night, known as nocturnal polyuria. The poll shows that while nocturia may affect more than a third of U.S. adults, 64% of Americans have no idea it is a diagnosable, treatable medical condition.

Worse yet, 66% of nocturia sufferers surveyed have never talked to their doctor or healthcare professional about it. Half of those patients reported they thought it was a normal part of aging; 27% said they believed that nothing could be done about it.

“We see patients who have suffered with nocturia for many years, as it slowly progresses from getting up twice to over four times per night to urinate,” said Benjamin M. Brucker, M.D., a specialist in urology and female pelvic medicine at NYU Langone Health. “Nocturia can have serious implications for an individual’s emotional state and daily life, due to sleep disruption, if not diagnosed and treated. Up until recently, we didn’t have an approved treatment specifically for nocturia.”

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